2012 Legalization of Medical Marijuana in Florida?


What are the chances that Florida will take steps to legalize medical marijuana in 2012? The chances increased late last year after State Senator Larcenia J. Bullard of Miami, filed Senate Joint Resolution 1028. Florida House of Representative Jeff Clements of Lake Worth, Florida, filed companion legislation, HJR 353.

Update 3/26/13: This legislation died in committee last year. Read more on legislation introduced in 2013 and efforts to get a constitutional amendment on the ballot in November of 2014 to legalize medical marijuana in Florida

Although this is the second consecutive year that such legislation has been filed by the Florida legislature it is the first time that medical marijuana bills were filed in both chambers. The joint resolutions propose legalizing marijuana in Florida for medicinal purposes. Efforts to legalize marijuana are picking up steam in Florida. Many believe it will only be a matter of time before some form of medical marijuana legislation is passed in Florida.

The battle to get the medical marijuana bill on the 2012 ballot begins. The joint resolutions would allow for medical marijuana cultivation and dispensaries to operate in Florida. The bills would also allow for individuals with debilitating medical conditions to use cannabis as a treatment with the recommendation of a medical doctor. Read more about Joint Resolutions for Medicinal Use of Cannabis (SJR 1028 and HJR 353).
What Would it Take to Get the Medical Marijuana Legislation on the 2012 Ballot?
Before the issue of legalizing medical marijuana would come up for a vote on the 2012 ballot, both the Florida State House and Senate would have to pass the bill by a three-fifths margin. If the bill passed by that margin then the legislation would qualify for the November 2012 ballot. 
Getting the legislation on the ballot is the hard part. Polls show that a majority of Florida citizens favor legalizing medical marijuana. If the legislation was approved by the voters, then medical marijuana would become legal in Florida on July 1, 2013.

Prohibition Doesn't Work
Many individuals favor the legalization of marijuana because it would bring in considerable revenue to the state from the regulation and taxation of cannabis. Currently that money is enjoyed by drug traffickers who benefit directly from prohibition. Additionally, the cultivation of marijuana in Florida would eliminate the market for marijuana which is smuggled over the boarder from Mexico. Even the DEA estimates that one-half of profits for the Mexican drug cartels result from the importation of marijuana. Eliminate the market for marijuana from the Mexican drug cartels in the United States and you drop their profits over night. Many also expect that decrease in drug trafficking to radically reduce violence at the boarder associated with drug trafficking. 
Regulation would also decrease the availability of marijuana by children. Many argue that high school children have a much easier time buying marijuana then alcohol. The taxation and regulation of marijuana would largely eliminate the black market and availability of cannabis to under aged individuals. 
Get Involved in the Debate over Legalizing Medical Marijuana in Florida

Various groups in Florida are asking citizens to sign petitions demanding that the Florida legislature take a vote on the medical marijuana bill that was filed in the House and Senate. One petition from an unnamed group has more than 7,000 signatures asking the legislature to "sign a discharge petitioner to permit a floor debate...." That petition can be found here - petition to vote on pending legislation to legalize medical marijuana in Florida.

Another organization, People United for Medical Marijuana is attempting to collect enough signatures on a petition to bypass the Republican legislature and force the issue on the November 2012 ballot. According to their website, as of Oct. 29, 2011, PUFMM had only gathered 29,922 signatures which is roughly 4% of the signatures needed.

Are you in favor of the legalization of medical marijuana in Florida or opposed to the idea? Should advocates for decriminalizing possession of marijuana  avoid the "medical marijuana" debate entirely and focus on the more transparent approach that cannabis should be legal for all adult consumers including healthy ones?

Let us know what you think of the proposed legislation or the best way to get involved in the debate. We welcome your comments below.
Florida Senate - 2012                                   SJR 1028
       
       By Senator Bullard       
       
       39-00857-12                                           20121028__
    1                       Senate Joint Resolution                     
    2         A joint resolution proposing the creation of Section
    3         28 of Article X and the creation of Section 32 of
    4         Article XII of the State Constitution to allow the
    5         medical use of cannabis by citizens, allow the
    6         Legislature to implement these provisions by general
    7         law, and provide an effective date.
    8  
    9  Be It Resolved by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
   10  
   11         That the following creation of Section 28 of Article X and
   12  the creation of Section 32 of Article XII of the State
   13  Constitution are agreed to and shall be submitted to the
   14  electors of this state for approval or rejection at the next
   15  general election or at an earlier special election specifically
   16  authorized by law for that purpose:
   17                              ARTICLE X                            
   18                            MISCELLANEOUS                          
   19         SECTION 28. Medical use of cannabis.—
   20         (a) Except as otherwise provided in subsections (g), (h),
   21  and (i), a patient or primary caregiver charged with a violation
   22  of the state’s criminal laws related to the patient’s medical
   23  use of cannabis has an affirmative defense to such allegation
   24  if:
   25         (1) The patient was previously diagnosed by a physician as
   26  having a debilitating medical condition;
   27         (2) The patient was advised by his or her physician, in the
   28  context of a bona fide physician-patient relationship, that the
   29  patient might benefit from the medical use of cannabis in
   30  connection with a debilitating medical condition; and
   31         (3) The patient and his or her primary caregiver were
   32  collectively in possession of amounts of cannabis only as
   33  permitted under this section.
   34  
   35  This affirmative defense does not exclude the assertion of any
   36  other defense by a patient or primary caregiver who is charged
   37  with a violation of state law related to the patient’s medical
   38  use of cannabis.
   39         (b) It is not a violation of the state’s criminal laws for
   40  a patient or primary caregiver to engage or assist in the
   41  medical use of cannabis pursuant to this section, except as
   42  otherwise provided in subsections (g) and (i).
   43         (c) It is not a violation of the state’s criminal laws for
   44  a physician to:
   45         (1) Advise a patient whom the physician has diagnosed as
   46  having a debilitating medical condition about the risks and
   47  benefits of the medical use of cannabis or that the patient
   48  might benefit from the medical use of cannabis, if such advice
   49  is based on the physician’s contemporaneous assessment of the
   50  patient’s medical history and current medical condition and a
   51  bona fide physician-patient relationship; or
   52         (2) Provide a patient with written documentation, based on
   53  the physician’s contemporaneous assessment of the patient’s
   54  medical history and current medical condition and a bona fide
   55  physician-patient relationship, stating that the patient has a
   56  debilitating medical condition and might benefit from the
   57  medical use of cannabis.
   58  
   59  A physician may not be denied any rights or privileges for
   60  engaging in acts authorized by this subsection.
   61         (d) Notwithstanding subsection (a), subsection (b), or
   62  subsection (c), a person, including a patient or primary
   63  caregiver, is not entitled to the protection of this section for
   64  his or her acquisition, possession, manufacture, production,
   65  use, sale, distribution, dispensing, or transportation of
   66  cannabis for any use other than medical use.
   67         (e) A property interest that is possessed, owned, or used
   68  in connection with the medical use of cannabis or acts
   69  incidental to such use may not be harmed, neglected, injured, or
   70  destroyed while in the possession of state or local law
   71  enforcement officials who seized the property in connection with
   72  the claimed medical use of cannabis. Such property interest may
   73  not be forfeited under any provision of state law providing for
   74  the forfeiture of property other than as a sentence imposed
   75  after conviction of a criminal offense or entry of a plea of
   76  guilty to such offense. Cannabis and paraphernalia seized by
   77  state or local law enforcement officials from a patient or
   78  primary caregiver in connection with the claimed medical use of
   79  cannabis shall be returned immediately upon the determination of
   80  the state attorney or his or her designee that the patient or
   81  primary caregiver is entitled to the protection contained in
   82  this section, including, but not limited to, by a decision not
   83  to prosecute, the dismissal of charges, or acquittal.
   84         (f)(1) A patient may engage in the medical use of cannabis
   85  with no more cannabis than is medically necessary to address a
   86  debilitating medical condition. The legislature may, by general
   87  law, establish a maximum amount of cannabis or cannabis plants,
   88  possession or use of which, or any lesser amount, is presumed to
   89  be medically necessary.
   90         (2) For quantities of cannabis in excess of an amount
   91  legislatively presumed to be medically necessary, a patient or
   92  his or her primary caregiver may raise as an affirmative defense
   93  to charges of violation of state law that such greater amounts
   94  were medically necessary to address the patient’s debilitating
   95  medical condition.
   96         (g) A patient may not:
   97         (1) Engage in the medical use of cannabis in a way that
   98  endangers the health or well-being of any person; or
   99         (2) Engage in the medical use of cannabis in plain view of,
  100  or in a place open to, the general public.
  101         (h) Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(1), a patient under
  102  eighteen years of age may not engage in the medical use of
  103  cannabis unless:
  104         (1) Two physicians have diagnosed the patient as having a
  105  debilitating medical condition;
  106         (2) One of the physicians referred to in paragraph (1) has
  107  explained the possible risks and benefits of medical use of
  108  cannabis to the patient and each of the patient’s parents
  109  residing in this state;
  110         (3) Each of the patient’s parents residing in this state
  111  consents in writing to permit the patient to engage in the
  112  medical use of cannabis;
  113         (4) A parent residing in this state consents in writing to
  114  serve as the patient’s primary caregiver;
  115         (5) The patient and primary caregiver collectively possess
  116  amounts of cannabis no greater than an amount authorized under
  117  subsection (d); and
  118         (6) The primary caregiver controls the acquisition of such
  119  cannabis and the dosage and frequency of its use by the patient.
  120         (i) No later than May 30, 2013, the legislature shall
  121  define such terms and enact such legislation as may be necessary
  122  for implementation of this section, as well as determine and
  123  enact criminal penalties for fraudulent representation of a
  124  medical condition by a patient to a physician or state or local
  125  law enforcement official for the purpose of avoiding arrest and
  126  prosecution.
  127         (j)(1) A health insurance provider may not be required to
  128  be liable for any claim for reimbursement for the medical use of
  129  cannabis.
  130         (2) This section does not require any employer to
  131  accommodate the medical use of cannabis in any work place.
  132         (3) A person may not be denied custody of or visitation
  133  with a minor for acting in accordance with this section and
  134  legislation implementing this section unless the person’s
  135  behavior creates an unreasonable danger to the minor that can be
  136  clearly articulated and shown by substantial competent evidence.
  137         (4) A person may not be denied any right or privilege and
  138  is not subject to arrest, prosecution, or penalty in any manner,
  139  including, but not limited to, a civil penalty or disciplinary
  140  action by a business, occupational, or professional licensing
  141  board, for providing a qualifying patient or primary caregiver
  142  of such a patient with cannabis or cannabis paraphernalia or for
  143  any other act done in accordance with this section or
  144  legislation implementing this section.
  145                             ARTICLE XII                           
  146                              SCHEDULE                             
  147         SECTION 32. Medical use of cannabis.—Section 28 of Article
  148  X providing for medical use of cannabis and this section shall
  149  take effect July 1, 2013.
  150         BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the following statement be
  151  placed on the ballot:
  152                      CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT                     
  153                        ARTICLE X, SECTION 28                      
  154                       ARTICLE XII, SECTION 32                     
  155         MEDICAL USE OF CANNABIS.—Proposing an amendment to the
  156  State Constitution to provide a patient or primary caregiver
  157  charged with a violation of the state’s criminal laws related to
  158  the patient’s medical use of cannabis, also known as marijuana,
  159  with a defense to the charge if the patient has a debilitating
  160  condition and the physician, in the context of a bona fide
  161  physician-patient relationship, determines that the patient
  162  might benefit from the medical use of cannabis. The amendment
  163  provides that a physician may advise a patient with a
  164  debilitating condition about the medical use of cannabis and
  165  document the patient’s need for this use. The amendment
  166  specifies that it does not authorize any nonmedical use of
  167  cannabis. The amendment provides that property seized as a
  168  result of an arrest in connection with a claimed medical use of
  169  cannabis may not be harmed unless the charge results in a
  170  criminal conviction. The amendment provides that a patient may
  171  engage in the medical use of cannabis with no more cannabis than
  172  is medically necessary and that the Legislature may establish a
  173  maximum amount of cannabis or cannabis plants, possession or use
  174  of which, or any lesser amount, is presumed to be medically
  175  necessary. The amendment provides that a patient may not engage
  176  in the medical use of cannabis in a way that endangers the
  177  health or well-being of any person or in plain view of, or in a
  178  place open to, the general public. The amendment provides
  179  additional restrictions on the medical use of cannabis by
  180  persons under 18 years of age. The amendment requires that, by a
  181  specified date, the Legislature must define such terms and enact
  182  such legislation as may be necessary for implementation of the
  183  amendment and enact criminal penalties for fraudulent
  184  representation of a medical condition by a patient to a
  185  physician or state or local law enforcement official for the
  186  purpose of avoiding arrest and prosecution. The amendment
  187  provides that a person may not be denied custody of or
  188  visitation with a minor for acting in accordance with this
  189  amendment unless the person’s behavior creates an unreasonable
  190  danger to the minor which can be clearly articulated and shown
  191  by substantial competent evidence. The amendment provides that a
  192  person may not be denied any right or privilege and is not
  193  subject to arrest, prosecution, or penalty in any manner,
  194  including, but not limited to, a civil penalty or disciplinary
  195  action by a business, occupational, or professional licensing
  196  board, for providing a qualifying patient or primary caregiver
  197  of such a patient with cannabis or cannabis paraphernalia or for
  198  any other act done in accordance with the amendment. The
  199  amendment is scheduled to take effect July 1, 2013. 
 
Related Links: 
Marijuana Laws in New York 

27 comments:

doin rite 4all said...

Need set amountt of plants .too vague. What about some protection for desenserys.i m from state that had the " BALLS" to give the ones that are suffering the choice of nateral or the the Pill mill. Did mopine for 10 yearz when was givin choice. FUCK U pill pusher morphin is one of the most evil drug ever to b invented. Good luck florida. Hope u all can do it . Ready to help get whats right. Thanks 4 doin the rite thing given the plant that "GOD" gave to use

Anonymous said...

AISPRINE VS:MARIJUANA WHO WILL O.D FIRST IF A BABY FINDS A BOTTLE OF AISPRINE,OR BOTTLE OF MEDIACAL MARIJUANA.IF YOU HAD TO PUT ONE IN YOUR HOUSE WHICH WOULD YOU PICK.ONE THAT CAN KILL YOUR BABY OR ONE THAT CAN JUST MAKE A BABY SLEEP .IF IT WERE TO HAPPEN YOU SEE THE INHUMANE IN THE DRUGS GOVERMENT IS PROVIDING OVER THE COUNTER.
PROOF IS RIGHT THERE.

Anonymous said...

WELL TRUCK NIGHT YOU SAID IT IN YOUR SECOND COMMENT SOMEWHAT. YOU WANT TO HELP YOU HAVE TO PROVE THAT THE MEDICINE DOCTORS PRESCRIBE OUR INHUMAN WITH SOCIETY AND OUR JUST THERE PRIMARLY TO KEEP PEOPLE SICK AND MONEY IN THERE POCKET ONCE YOU CAN PROVE THESE FACTORS YOU CAN ALMOST BRIBE THEM WITH A UNPULLED GUN TO THERE FACE BY SUEING THEM BUT IF YOU REALLY CARE THEN YOU WOULD USE THAT MONEY TO OVER THROW THE PEOPLE WHO WANT IT ILLEGAL BY BUYING THEM OUT SINCE ITS WHAT THEY WANT ANY WAYS BASICALLY STEALING THERE MONEY OFFERING IT BACK TO THEM FOR A BARRGAIN WITH INVISIBLE GUN.BUT YET ITS A LAWYER JUST HAVE TO PROVE YOUR EVIDENCE AGAINST THEM.

Anonymous said...

As someone who has extremely mild epilepsy (three seizures over five years), I would much rather use medical marijuana for treatment instead of a pharmaceutical with a longer list of side effects than stars in the sky.

jgrass1k0809 said...

I had just wrote a paper on the legalization of marijuana in the state of Florida. YES I am for the legalization too! I listed some of the same reasoning's in my paper as well i.e. "marijuana can bring in revenue, and taxed." Some of the revenue can be put towards many funding like hurricane disasters! I think it is absolutely ridiculous that marijuana is not legal, which is harmless, and yet alcohol causes numerous crime related incidences and legal. I live in Arizona where it has recently been passed to have medical marijuana for certain diseases, but haven't seen anything that A.D.D. or thyroid condition falls under. Would like to see what ALL medical marijuana can be justified for, being that I prefer to smoke vs taking a pill. Thanks for reading.

Anonymous said...

yes!!! It is the olny way you will ever close the pill mills. My sister was overdosed by pill mill doctors she was sent to by workers comp, from us post office injury. Went to dea with massive proof. they told us hes just too slippery. Made his money off you!! us post worker. Check out history in ohio for william leak or thomas a ranieri. its all public information. lost licenses at times due to their own substance abuse, given back license working for you. allied pain treatment center cols.ohio She survived after 6 weeks on lung bipass machine. Help save the hurting from pill mills. and bad doctors. Put nurses in charge of dispensing. Mary RN sarasota, fl.

Anonymous said...

Good article. I feel, however, that the majority of responses would work against legalization! Only one person (anonymous with epilepsy) appears capable of writing a coherent sentence that expresses a cohesive thought. Such rambling verbiage, lack of basic grammar, and misspellings do nothing to help sway legislators or anyone "sitting on the fence".

Anonymous said...

if we legalize it it will slow down the pill abuse in florida an people can use marijuana for pain instead of pills. achool is way worse nothing bad can happen on marijuana

Anonymous said...

Marijuana needs to be legalized soon. Kids my age have fallen into a new synthetic marijuana called k2 which is highly toxic and is not meant for human consumption. Many kids just in my county have OD'd on this new drug. It is very simple to aquire it as well, it is sold in every smoke shop tht I've seen and most store clerks don't ask for ID. Many people can really benefit from the legalization of weed and it may just save some lives.

Anonymous said...

People that say marijuana is a bad "drug" are so ridiculous. Those are people that haven't even tried it, & have nothing better to do but discriminize it. It doesn't hurt anybody, physically or mentally, I think it actually helps you in both ways. I've been smoking weed for like 6 years straight now & i've never had a problem, so therefore I'm sure they should consider the fact of legalizing a natural being plant, all it does is keeps stress away & makes you feel a whole lot better. the only bad part about the whole legalization process is that when it does get legalized, its gonna be so much harder to find work being the fact that its gonna be medical uses only & alot of people are gonna go dry once that happens, & you're gonna have to pay like 50 bucks for a 10, which is pretty wack. But I still favor the legalization & I hope it happens soon.

marchelle hernandez said...

never mind all the munbo jumbp for a stupid weed , just lealize it and use it to solve all of our problems includung the economy that is the only thing that matters, Ill sign what ever you want.

Anonymous said...

Cannabis helps Tinnitus "ringing in the ears"

Anonymous said...

I think the amendment was well written but lacks two very pertinent issues, the first would be an implementation requiring the field to be part of study by all physicians,P.A's, N.P 's and midwives, I feel this implementation could benefit the cause tremendously. Consequently, I see no clause requiring employeers to no longer be able to test for marijuana as preemployment screening, as this would dissway numerous individuals who could benefit from even trying to attain such a prescription or support such an amendment. If the bill is passed with the forementioned stipulations I think illegal use,by those without prescription, would be easier to identify thus discrediting the need for prescreening. With that said the one obstacle I see is tht prescription holders will decide to share with friends, for this I believe that fines and civil penalties should be imposed..if the patients thc levels are tested often they should match the prescribed amount if not the provider can make assesments and impose penalties. Also this may be a shot in the dark here, but an almost dreamlike addition would be the removal of records for those convicted of marijuana possesion for personal use, again to help those in need to be able to confidentaly choose this treatment, by leaving this issue out I feel wil cause greater harm to the effort of passing the bill; frankly I feel if this is not done resentful users who where fined will either uprise against those now able to receive it free of penalty or maintain a resentment and break the rules continously, ultimately reversing the propsed affects of using this as a treatment and will dismantle the entire argument leaving the field obselete. Although I do not feel that the aforementioned should be allowed to file civil suits for reimbursments of any kind due to their breaking the law but that in light of new evidence they may once again be restored to their equitable rights by record removal, placing a vast majority of those who suffered financial demise the ability to gain employment free from discrimination, promoting self sufficiency by reducing disability claims and removing some from welfare that lost or are unable to attain employment due to criminal/civil records. This should not apply to individuals with selling/manufacturing and trafficking charges especially with those found with various substances because this would suggest that manufacturing and sale without license would be acceptable. Although one could argue record removal for users would be bias, but not in the context of this new bill, that is proposing that the public has been misled by inaccurate information on use and thus should not have had to been bound under any prohibition. Users should have the right to be assesed for their need and if in fact it is proven they can gain substantial health benefit for their use be given the chance to obtain a prescption without discrimination; All others would be given a second chance to prove they can comply with the new laws now that it would no longer be easily accessible. Similiar to alchohol prohibition, readily available and used in modesty people were willing to take the risk to reject bounds place upon their individual freedom, it in fact created a social issue the willingness to be socially devient due to percieved injustice, idk how to better express that view but I just wanted to add that this will be constitutionally groundbreaking and if passed will require a lot of change and explanation for the American public, not just Floridians.

Anonymous said...

im 42 and cant work much at all due to lower back disc being out of place. every day im in pain. cant afford a doctor. and the pills that were given to me for pain dont work. i live in florida and would like for the medical law to pass. it wood be a great deal to many seniors who suffer from most illnesses. please legalize it in florida. THANK YOU.

Anonymous said...

Here is a problem I see with legalizing it . Do you think the drug cartels are gonna like all the little caregiver shops popping up on their turf ? I would think it would give a reason to the Mexican drug lord terrorists to come over to my country shoot blow up or otherwise ruin what could have been a good thing. So if someone can show me a plan on how to handle that scenario cool.

Anonymous said...

I live here in florida, I have cerbal palsy. I do not take anything for pain but advil. There are so many people hooked on man made pain meds thay are killing them. Maijuana is all natural and isnt killing your organs. Im for it. Alcohol same thing kills your organs. peole need relief and I think its safer then what is over the counter, it would also reduce pill abuse in florida which has killed so many. Have you ever heard of anyone dying from smoking maijuana? Have you heard of anyone taking pills??? Theres your answer.

Anonymous said...

As someone who suffers from rheumatoid arthritis,parkinsons disease,and several forms of Dystonia(which can be excruciatingly painful)I believe that I should be able to make the decision to choose something that is a natural substance as opposed to manufactured,other illness causeing drugs.I currently take sixteen different medications,which I absolutely hate but have no other choice.These medications are known to cause kidney,liver,and heart problems.So here I sit with no options other than to know eventually those illnesses along with those I have all ready are only a matter of time.medical marijuana could easily eliminate more than half of the current medications I take.Tell me why as a law abidding citizen I should not be able to make a choice that best suits my needs as a patient

Mark Barnette said...

I live in constant pain, and have a pain pump implanted in me giving me continuous dilaudid 24 hours. I also have to take opoiates everyday just to be able to function. Marijuana helps my pain more than any of these other medications and feel I should be given a choice of the types of medication that works for my body not what the government says I need. I am 52 years old and have been in pain for over 30 years now and deserve some relief.

MrMike said...

Wow. I read all the comments, and some of you are really not helping the "cause" with your street talk and mumbo jumbo....truth is, i can get any pill i want, oxy-contin, delauded, oxy-codone, hydro-codone...I refuse because taking these pills "as prescribed" almost killed me...landed me in the hospital for a week.
I was living in MN at the time, and I told my surgeon (an Ivy League" graduate, that smoking marijuana was not like the pills i was prescribed...the pills had only masked the pain, you are still in pain, but so much under the pills effect, that you can kinda ignore it, but when the effect goes away, you need more of the pills, and it will avalanche causing many good people to tragedy, as well as their families...but I told him the marijuana actually took the pain away, and i made a joke and said "even TV is a little funnier"...my surgeon laughed and said "Laughter is "the best medicine" of all...I wish I could prescribe that, but yes, I can't tell you to take marijuana, but (he winked and said) whatever works, do it"...
I do not want to end up in jail from FL tough marijuana laws, and actually, having moved here only 5 months ago I wouldnt even kow where to buy some...but please, if any gov officials are reading this, please relax from giving harsh penalties for those who just smoke at home for pain, it's not fair that we have to live in chronic pain, it isn't...and the answer is right here in our faces...please let's change these laws, and the government too shall reap many benefits.
My 2 cents.

MrMike said...

uIdeWow. I read all the comments, and some of you are really not helping the "cause" with your street talk and mumbo jumbo....truth is, i can get any pill i want, oxy-contin, delauded, oxy-codone, hydro-codone...I refuse because taking these pills "as prescribed" almost killed me...landed me in the hospital for a week.
I was living in MN at the time, and I told my surgeon (an Ivy League" graduate, that smoking marijuana was not like the pills i was prescribed...the pills had only masked the pain, you are still in pain, but so much under the pills effect, that you can kinda ignore it, but when the effect goes away, you need more of the pills, and it will avalanche causing many good people to tragedy, as well as their families...but I told him the marijuana actually took the pain away, and i made a joke and said "even TV is a little funnier"...my surgeon laughed and said "Laughter is "the best medicine" of all...I wish I could prescribe that, but yes, I can't tell you to take marijuana, but (he winked and said) whatever works, do it"...
I do not want to end up in jail from FL tough marijuana laws, and actually, having moved here only 5 months ago I wouldnt even kow where to buy some...but please, if any gov officials are reading this, please relax from giving harsh penalties for those who just smoke at home for pain, it's not fair that we have to live in chronic pain, it isn't...and the answer is right here in our faces...please let's change these laws, and the government too shall reap many benefits.
My 2 cents.

Anonymous said...

I am in favor of legalization. Same as alcohol, regulated and taxed. I would very much enjoy the drug test rules being dropped because I firmly believe what a person does after work is their own business. I want to believe America is ready for this but to those who have never partaken in the herb I'm sure they are doubtful.
Why not take the criminal element out of it like ending prohibition.

Anonymous said...

We should start on crowd funding sites to generate enough money to fire the imbreads that keep canabis illigal... Shame On You Florida... Get educated already... if a few of us make a crowdfunding account there is a good chance that one of us will make one cool enough to get enough money to over throw these bastards...So my grandmother can have some cannabis oil and get a decent nights sleep already...GOOGLE CROWD FUNDING and start your profiles... people generate 100's of thousands with out greasy govt banks all the time for good causes... I really think this will work... We must Fight FIRE with FIRE to destroy this evil... here is one source {crowdfunding dot com} there are many...Please Help...Ps not affiliated with above domain

BOBBY BOBBYLANE said...

Follow California plan! If we could have the chance of a Marijuana shop we the people would have no need for cartels and cartels will have no need for us the USA. Includeing home wrecking due to a harsh penalties.. Tax the shops and make the money! Thats what it is all about. Marijane is harmless! Happiness! We would not have no need for drama. Just laughter! Our choice..

Anonymous said...

This would be a colossal achievement for Florida I'm from the Bay Area myself. And it kills me to see people addicted to sicking drugs like Oxycontin or morphine. Which is basically like heroin in a bottle. For one thing this make great profit for the state of Florida. Also it truly does help people who are sick, but without having them get addicted or having bad side-effects. And would also help stop the usage of actual dangerous drugs. Another thing people can stop buying shitty bud from scum and dealers who lace their weed. And can now make it safer getting grad A medical marijuana.

ryan wright said...

For that reason, except if you wish to go all the way down the direction of trying to change human nature, isn't it better to tax and regulate? This would better protect children and the vulnerable, ensure that users have access to safe, quality controlled, product, properly labelled with cannabinoid content. It would also enable us to realise the enormous therapeutic benefits of cannabis or spice incense which are validated by scientific evidence more conclusively than many pharmaceutical products.

Michael Minardi said...

Join www.ImaPatientNotaCrimina.Org and help get his down. Cannabis is the safest and most effective medicine known to man.

Anonymous said...

Florida should follow Colorado and Washington State's lead.......let us smoke!!!!!!!

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Sammis Law Firm
1005 N. Marion St.
Tampa, FL 33602
(813) 250-0500